Teaching resources

Below are free teaching resources that may be of use to diversifying psychology.

How racism & class overlap
A 5-minute animated video based on a lecture is available below.

The Social Construction of Race_Seminar

ObjectiveHow will this be achieved?
1.    To  understand the social construction of racismYouTube videos + Kahoots quiz + discussion
2.    To analyse how racism operates institutionally and to apply this understanding to the institution/discipline of psychologyReading through Guardian article on institutional racism experiences and answering quiz. Some discussion (if time permits) on how these intuitional experiences might relate to the white/western/male dominance of psychology

Format: This seminar should take approximately 120 minutes and consists of playing 3 short youtube videos outlining the social construction of race and 1 article published in the Guardian on institutional racism. Quiz questions, answers and video/article links are listed The Social Construction of Race_Seminar.

General teaching resources

  • Teaching Tolerance [Free resources for educators, primarily for those who work with children from early childhood through to high school/college but with content that can be used and applied to Higher Education.  Their materials are used to supplement curriculums and inform practices; not limited to race and racism, Teaching Tolerance has content on ability, religion, class, gender, sexual identity, immigration, bullying and bias, and rights and activism.  Some examples of content are Teaching about race, racism and police violence and Discussing Whiteness].
  • White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack [A checklist that can be used in seminar activities with students to highlight aspects of everyday white privilege].
  • Our Migration Story [a wealth of resources around migration to the British Isles, including input from around 80 academics. Particularly useful to counter anti-immigration rhetoric and myths about the British being historically white. This is a prize winning resource specifically designed for teachings in mind. It’s teaching resources pages also includes guides on how to teach controversial issues in the classroom by Oxfam and the Imperial War Museum].

Research on teaching anti-racism:

  • Torino’s (2015) useful paper examining different learning exercises for promoting anti-racism including experiential learning, group based learning and didactic methods.
  • Case & Rios (2015). Experiment assessing whether paper handout or video exercise is more effective as a teaching strategy in developing white privilege.
  • Teaching racism to psychology students: This study concerns a quantitative evaluation of teaching an anti-racism module by the author to a large cohort of White and BME students.

Resources for talking about ‘race’*

  • Our Migration Story [a wealth of resources around migration to the British Isles, including input from around 80 academics. Particularly useful to counter anti-immigration rhetoric and myths about the British being historically white. This is a prize winning resource specifically designed for teachings in mind. It’s teaching resources pages also includes guides on how to teach controversial issues in the classroom by Oxfam and the Imperial War Museum].
  • Lentin, A. (2019). In the lecturer’s recent Guardian article she notes that: “To really stamp out racism, we need to begin with a commitment to deepening our racial literacy, and for a majority white society to depersonalise its reaction to racism” (para 16). https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/dec/10/racism-election-defined
  • Kerr (2019). Let’s talk about race. [Useful guide from the ‘Princes’ Responsible Business Network’ that has done previous work on employment racism. This guide is from business sector on holding race discussions, arising from their survey findings that sizable proportions of employees feel thier workplace is uncomfortable talking about race equality (around 35% from their 2015 and 2018 survey data). The guide is for an adult audience and includes notes on preferred terms (e.g., BAME/ ethnic minority), what to avoid saying and how to do this respectfully. Note the economic case for racial equality is often made (‘being anti-racist is profitable’) which some see as a dangerous and irresponsible argument to make given anti-racism should be done for moral purposes independant of financial gain)].
  • Runnyemede Trust (n.d.). Reframing race. See below.

Share teaching resources

If you would like to share any teaching resources that could be used to further develop a curriculum away from its White, Western bias (e.g., through content demonstrating the structural system of racism or through content on psychology outside of the West) please use our Contact page or email g.jankowski@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.

*(in ” to denote this is a social construction following Kevin Hylton’s work)